Integrated River Basin Management Case Study

Due to the effects of climate change and the increasing demand on water, sustainable development in term of water resources management has become a major challenge. In this context, the application of simulation models is useful to duel with the uncertainty and complexity of water system by providing stakeholders with the best solution. This paper outlines an integrated management planning network is developed based on Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) to evaluate current and future water management system of Langat River Basin, Malaysia under various scenarios. The WEAP model is known as an integrated decision support system investigate major stresses on demand and supply in terms of water availability in catchment scale. In fact, WEAP is applicable to simulate complex systems including various sectors within a single catchment or transboundary river system. To construct the model, by taking account of the Langat catchment and the corresponding demand points, we defined the hydrological model into 10 sub-hydrological catchments and 17 demand points included the export of treated water to the major cities outside the catchment. The model is calibrated and verified by several quantitative statistics (coefficient of determination, R2; Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, NSE and Percent bias, PBIAS). The trend of supply and demand in the catchment is evaluated under three scenarios to 2050, 1: Population growth rate, 2: Demand side management (DSM) and 3: Combination of DSM and reduce non-revenue water (NRW). Results show that by reducing NRW and proper DSM, unmet demand able to reduce significantly.

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Supporting integrated water resources management in the Koshi Basin, and beyond

Dave Penton, Luis Neumann, Tanya Doody, Tira Foran, Susan Cuddy and Hongxing Zhen
CSIRO, Australia

Through its own water reform journey, Australia has learnt many water management lessons that are universally applicable. These include the need to have agreement on the amount of water that is available, the demands that are made on it, and how it can be best shared to ensure that the livelihoods of the people and ecosystems that it supports are sustained. The Sustainable Development Investment Portfolio (SDIP) is an Australian government initiative with the goal of increasing water, food and energy security in South Asia, targetting the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly women and girls. Through SDIP, CSIRO is working with Nepali organisations that are responsible for their own water reform journey, with the aim to assist in building the evidence base necessary to guide strategic investments in water resources development.

A key target sector is water resources management. CSIRO has supported revisions to rainfall station locations, development of new gridded rainfall products and refinement of hydrological models, all of which lead to better understanding of the timing and availability of water in major streams, including under projected changes to climate.

We are working with local researchers to value-add on existing analyses of a) household livelihood strategies in the Koshi basin and b) links between stream-flow and ecology in Nepal. Nepali scientists have a deep understanding of how water moving through rivers and wetlands supports ecological species (e.g. birds, fish, macro-invertebrates), that is the river flow-ecology relationship. We are working with them to systematise this knowledge. The key benefit of understanding river flow-ecology relationships is that, when river flow changes occur, evidence is available to understand the likely impact on the ecosystems and livelihoods that it supports.

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