Cold Call Cover Letter Tips Examples

How on earth would you go about applying for a job at a company that’s not hiring? Well, that’s when a cold-contact cover letter comes in to play. In this short guide, you’ll discover how to create an outstanding cold-contact cover letter to ensure businesses can’t refuse your application, even when they’re not looking to hire!

What’s a cold-contact cover letter?

Cover letters are essentially a letter of introduction to the job you’re applying for. It complements your CV and goes into more detail about your skills, experience and ambitions, and offers an insight into your personality.

Typically you’d write a cover letter because you’ve seen a job advertised and you want to apply, right? Well, what about if a company isn’t advertising jobs, but you want to inquire about potential availabilities. That’s when a cold-contact cover letter comes into play. The aim is to sell yourself for a position that may not exist yet so that when an opportunity does arise, you’re the first person the recruiter thinks of.

Cold-contact cover letters can also be labelled as letters of inquiry, letters of interest, speculative cover letters or prospecting cover letters.

Is it worth it?

If you’ve tried everything to get a job and you’re still having no luck you may choose to hand out your CV to a few companies just in case they have some positions opening up that would suit you. Also, there may be a company or two that you want to work for, but they’re not hiring, so you choose to send a CV their way just in case.

These are both examples of cold-contact, but sending a CV alone isn’t enough to secure you a potential position; you need a cover letter to sell yourself effectively, too.

When writing a cover letter in response to a job ad, you’d use the job description to make sure you’re highlighting the skills and experience they’re after. Cold-contact cover letters are much trickier because you don’t have the luxury of the job description to guide you; instead, you have to assume you know what the company needs and prove that you can offer it.

Cover letters can take lots of time to carefully craft, but cold-contact cover letters may take even longer. Therefore, it’s best to stick with one or two companies that you want to work for and aim for them.

Do your research!

If you do decide to write a cold-contact cover letter, it’s essential that you do your research properly. You need to be sure that the company you’re approaching will be able to utilise someone with your skills and abilities; it’s no good talking about how you’ve got plenty of experience within construction if you’re planning to send your cover letter and CV to a PR firm.

So, when you’re researching the company, make sure you know exactly what they do and how they operate, so you can explain why you’d be such a good fit. Also, research their leading competitors and any latest news trends related to the sector to highlight that you’re a professional in the know.

It’s also extremely important to research who your CV and cover letter should be sent to. You might find a company address or a general recruitment email address, but you should look for a specific person to send it to – that way it’s less likely to get lost in the junk mail!

Keep an eye out for the head of recruitment; they’re the one you want to send your documents too; the personal touch makes a great first impression and lets them know you’ve done your research.

How do I write one?

Below is a template of the basic format of a cold-contact cover letter. It’s pretty much identical to any other cover letter, except you need to use your knowledge of the company and sector and your general initiative to craft it, rather than a job description.

[Address Line 1]

[Address Line 2]

[Address Line 3]

[Address Line 4]

[Phone Number]

 

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[Company Address Line 1] [Company Address Line 2] [Company Address Line 3] [Company Address Line 4]

 

[Date]

 

Dear [Name],

 

Paragraph 1:

Your opening paragraph should be ready to hook the reader. Begin with a bold statement relaying exactly why you’d be a valuable asset to the company and why you want to work for them. Be clear in the fact that you’re going to make their company so much better, rather than suggesting that the company is going to help you.

 

Paragraphs 2 & 3:

This is your chance to share your skills relevant to the role you have in mind. You MUST use your experience to back this up, or your claims won’t be credible. Also, make sure these claims relate to the company’s needs and goals, or they simply won’t want to know – this is why research is so important! Now would also be a good time to mention any connections you may have with the company, but make sure your connection is comfortable with the mention first.

 

Paragraph 4:

At this point, you need to address a call to action. Tell them that your CV is attached and request an interview, phone call, or meeting. You might even go small-scale and ask if the company is soon to be at any job fairs.

 

Yours sincerely,

[Your name]

Hard copy or email?

The template above is for a hard copy of a cold-contact cover letter, in that it’s a formal letter designed to be posted! You might find that sending an email is a preferred or a more convenient form of contact for the head of recruitment though – and it’s probably easier to find their email address!

So, there are only a few minor changes to the format if you’re sending this cover letter via email. Firstly, you can remove the company address and your personal address. You might also want to consider changing the sign-off to something a little less formal such as ‘kind regards’ or ‘best wishes’.

Secondly, you need to come up with a subject line for the email. It could be something as simple as ‘inquiry for a sales role’, or something more daring like ‘want to hire someone who can increase sales by 20%?’.

Another great thing about sending an electronic copy is that you can attach links! Believe us; if a recruiter spots a link, they’re going to click on it, so why not use this to your advantage? Include your LinkedIn URL, and if your Twitter is an extension of your professional brand, include that as well.

Also, if you’ve got your website, blog, or any other type of online portfolio, tack that on too. These links should be placed neatly under your sign-off to create a professional looking signature.

Our 5 top tips

  1. You MUST find out who you’re contacting. Otherwise, you’re likely to be ignored. If you absolutely can’t find a relevant name to address the letter to, then change the salutation to ‘To Sir/Madam’ and the sign-off to ‘Yours faithfully’.
  2. Be creative in your opening. You can’t just say that you’re looking for a job within the company because it’s related to the career you hope to have. You need to wow the recruiter.
  3. Let your personality shine through. The point of a cover letter is so recruiters can get to know you in more detail. So while it’s important to be professional, don’t be afraid to explain things with a touch of character.
  4. Include a call to action. You need to prompt some form of contact or response as it’s just too easy for a recruiter you ignore you.
  5. Keep it short and easy to read. Of course, you want to squeeze all your best bits into the letter, but you need to write concisely and effectively. It should be no longer than an A4 page, and don’t worry if it’s less!

Example of a cold-contact cover letter

Below is an example of a cold-contact cover letter for someone seeking a sales position.

123 Any Way

Any Town

Any County

Any Postcode

01234 567 890

 

123 Any Way

Any Town

Any County

Any Postcode

1st January 2000

 

Dear Kate,

 

The information displayed on your website suggests that you are an extremely progressive company with an eye for detail in the property sector and that is exactly why I am interested in working for you. With my expert knowledge of six years working in sales, I believe I can assist the company to evolve into the leading brand.

 

I am currently working at a construction company as a sales manager. In this role, I act as a mentor for a team of twelve and frequently monitor performance to generate sales within the field on a daily basis, in addition to keeping our sales and expenditure forecasts on target. I oversee a lot of the strategic movement within the sales department, too, and as a result of my open-minded approach, I have exceeded the company’s ambitious sales targets by 20% year on year.

 

Not only do I have an indispensable skill set for sales and management, but I also have experience in the construction and property market. After graduating with an upper-second class degree in Planning and Real Estate, I have spent my career observing and identifying the performance of leading brands within construction and property. With my unparalleled industry insights, I have been extremely successful in securing sales and helping companies to the forefront of the market.

 

I would greatly appreciate the chance to arrange an interview to discuss potential job opportunities and the contributions I could make to the company. Please find my CV enclosed for your reference. I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Yours sincerely,

Jack Evans

Related Career Advice articles

Sending an application for a job opening that does not exist for the time being is a high risk, high reward maneuver. The best person to address your application would be the Human Resources Manager. For sure, he receives hundreds or thousands of job applications each day. His group may be focused only on processing job applications for official company postings. There are Human Resource Managers who upon finding an application that does not conform to the posted job, will just place it in a 201 file. Thus, it is possible that your application may never see the light of day.

At the same time, the Human Resources Manager may view your application as a sign of confidence and self-belief. The key is in how you craft the content of your cover letter.

In the first paragraph, make it clear that you are aware of the sterling reputation of the company you are applying for. Follow it up immediately on why you decided to send a cold contact cover letter. If you’ve read news reports the company is expanding operations, indicate the facts as you know them and credit the source.

HR Personnel appreciate it when the candidate undertakes extra effort to conduct research. It shows determination and commitment to see this endeavor through.

In the body, state your qualifications. Give details on your relevant job experiences which are congruent with the company’s business development plans. Indicate any projects or undertakings that are related or could be of great value to the company you are applying to. Share your accomplishments the past 1 to 2 years and the significance of these to the industry. The general idea is to get the attention of the recipient; to open his eyes and make him think he may have stumbled upon a great addition to the company.

Sending a cold contact cover letter is a risky proposition because you are trying to create a need where there is none, at least for the moment. It takes guts to go through with this approach. HR Managers may take this against you or in favor of you. Either way, your cover letter should sustain the same level of grit and determination.

In your conclusion, it is very important to maintain a sense of optimism. This sends the message to the recipient that you respect his opinion but are certain he understands your purpose. Reiterate your confidence in your experience and potential contribution to their company.

Cold Contact Cover Letter- Sent to an employer that has not advertised job openings

Matthew Smith
Address
City, State, Zip Code
Contact Number
E-mail Address

September 1, 2015

Mr. Louis Jordan
Human Resources Manager
ABC Management Consultants
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Mr. Jordan,

ABC Management Consultants is widely regarded as the best property development firm in the country. Your reputation in providing top notch services in property evaluation and research remains unparalleled in the industry. I read in yesterday’s edition of The Daily Telegraph that your company is planning to expand operations in an effort to accommodate the increasing demand for property in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Parramatta. Thus, I decided to use the moment as an opportunity to present my services to ABC Management Consultants.

In the last two years, I was involved in projects which spearheaded research work funded by government agencies and by private international banks which focused on the property sector of Australia. There had been growing interest in overseeing the growth and market expansion patterns of Australia particularly in the cities of Sydney and Melbourne because the increase in property values have not been congruent with the weakening of the Australian Dollar and other currencies vis-à-vis the United States Dollar. I have done studies that seek to uncover the relationships between currency fluctuations, interest rate movements and consumer behavioral patterns in light of these property increases.

I believe my expertise and experience in the real estate property sector shall provide valuable assistance to your company’s endeavors over the next few years. I am hopeful that my curriculum vitae and portfolio of work shall merit enough consideration to warrant further opportunity to explore the possibility of working with your organization.

Thank you very much and I hope to hear from you soon.

Yours sincerely,
Matthew Smith

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